Des

Hey! I'm Des!

Welcome to Life’s Ambrosia where Dinner is served and memories are made. Here you will find over 1000 tried and true recipes for every possible occasion. In the last 10 years, this blog has helped millions of families put dinner on the table and create food memories. Let me help you too.

Read more »

Have new recipes emailed to you.

Pork Potstickers

These pork potstickers are stuffed with a savory pork and vegetable filling and steam-fried for a juicy potsticker with perfectly crisp bottom.

Once glance at an Asian menu and chances are you’ll see some kind of dumpling on the appetizer menu. And I don’t know about you but I cannot resist dumplings with a juicy filling and a perfectly crispy bottom. 

Holding a pork potsticker with two red chopsticks.

Enter these Pork Potstickers. They are loaded with ground pork, veggies and seasonings and then pan-fried until the bottoms are perfectly crisp. 

In addition to teaching you the fry-steam-fry technique, in this post you’ll also find info on how to freeze them so that you can have these scrumptious potstickers on hand anytime you get the craving! 

Potstickers on a white plate with sauce.

What is the difference between wontons, potstickers and gyoza.

This is a question that many people ask. And they aren’t all that different. They are all a type of dumpling. Dumplings are usually made by wrapping a meat and/or vegetable filling in a dough wrapper. They are then either steamed, boiled, pan fried or fried. 

Wontons: Often filled with savory fillings like cream cheese, veggies or meat. Wontons are usually boiled or deep fried. 

Gyoza: Japanese version that are usually prepared much in the same way that potstickers are. They are often a little smaller than potstickers but still have the classic crispy bottom. 

Potstickers: Like wontons and gyoza are filled with a filling and wrapped in dough. Then they are usually fried-steamed-fried. This gives you the crispy bottom with the steamed top that we are all used to when we think of potstickers. 

Overhead photo cooking potstickers in a cast iron skillet.

PORK POTSTICKERS INGREDIENTS: 

Pork: Ground pork works best for this recipe. Make sure it’s plain ground pork not any kind of seasoned sausage. 

Carrots and Celery: Both of these ingredients add a nice crunch to the filling but make sure that you mince them. It’ll be better for the texture. 

Diced carrots in a measuring cup on a wooden cutting board.

Shiittake Mushrooms: These are a Japanese mushroom that have a smoky, earthy flavor that works great in these potstickers. If you can’t find them you can substitute crimini mushrooms. 

DES TIP: The stems of shiitake mushrooms are very tough and it is best to remove and discard them before cooking. 

Shiitake mushrooms on a wooden cutting board.

Wrappers: You will want to use round “gyoza” wrappers for this recipe. You should be able to find these in the refrigerated part of the produce section. Or they can be found frozen. If they are frozen make sure to thaw them before using. 

That’s it for the vegetables and meat but several seasonings also go into potstickers. Most of these ingredients can be found in a well stocked grocery store. I often find them in the “Asian” aisle. 

Fish Sauce: A staple in Asian cooking, fish sauce adds a savory umami flavor to dishes. 

Hot Chili Oil: An oil made with red chili peppers. It does add a bit of heat and can be left out if desired. 

Sesame Oil: Adds a nuttiness to the dish. 

Ground Ginger: I keep it on hand at all times but you can use fresh grated ginger for more of a gingery punch! 

Soy Sauce: Adds saltiness 

Teriyaki Sauce: Adds a sweet and salty flavor to the final dish. 

Step by Step Photos and Instructions: 

Pork potstickers step by step photos.

STEP #1: Use your hands to mix pork, veggies and seasonings together in a bowl until well combined. The filling should hold together. 

STEP #2: Place a teaspoon of filling into the center of each wrapper.  You don’ want to over fill them or the wrappers will split when cooking. 

STEP #3: Dip finger in water and run it along the side of the wrapper. Fold over and pinch closed.

STEP 4: Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add in potstickers in a single layer (be sure to space them out) and cook for 2 minutes or until the bottoms start to brown. Carefully pour in water and cover. Cook 5 – 7 minutes or until water is absorbed. Remove lid and cook another 1 – 2 minutes to crisp the bottom. 

DES’ TIP: Make sure to no overcrowd the pan. Giving the potstickers enough room is essential to a crispy bottom. 

What do you dip potstickers in?

For these potstickers, I made the spicy chili oil from my shrimp and pork wontons in spicy sauce. You can also use ponzu sauce or even sweet Thai chili sauce. 

Dipping a potsticker in sauce.

Tips for freezing pork pot stickers: 

One of my favorite things about making potstickers is that they are so easy to freeze. You can make a big batch, freeze some and then cook them whenever you get the craving. 

I do have a couple of tips to ensure success for making frozen potstickers: 

Tip #1: Freeze any potstickers that you are not going to cook immediately. You’ll want to place them in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze them individually. This will help ensure that they don’t stick together. 

Tip #2: Thaw completely before cooking. I usually put them in the refrigerator for about 30 – 45 minutes to allow them to thaw a bit before cooking. If you don’t thaw them first, you run the risk of the filling being cold when the outside is cooked. 

Inside of pork potstickers.

If you love these pork potstickers, you’ll fall head over heels for these my favorite Asian Recipes

Instant Pot Chicken Adobo 

Filipino Pancit Recipe

Filipino Lumia with Lumpia Sauce

Chicken Potstickers 

Salt and Pepper Calamari 

Note: This post was originally posted in 2009. It was updated with new tips on freezing, as well as step by step photos and nutrition facts in 2020. 

Pork Potstickers Recipe

Makes 50 Prep Time: Cook Time:
5 based on 6 reviews

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 pound ground pork
  • 1/2 cup diced carrot
  • 1 cup chopped shiitake mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup diced celery
  • 1/2 teaspoon fish sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons teriyaki
  • 50 gyoza wrappers (wonton wrappers cut into circles)
  • water to seal wrappers

Instructions

1

In a bowl combine all ingredients, except wrappers and water, in a bowl. Mix well.

2

Place 1 tablespoon of mixture into a gyoza wrapper. Dip your finger in water and run along the outside edge of the wrapper. Fold wrapper over the mixture and pinch closed. Repeat with remaining filling and wrappers.

3

To freeze, place uncooked potstickers on a baking sheet in a single layer. Freeze until solid. Transfer to freezer bags.

4

To cook, heat a little oil in a skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Place pot stickers in the skillet and fry 2 minutes or until bottoms are golden brown. Pour in water, cover and cook 5-7 minutes or until water is absorbed.

Notes

Enjoy!

Nutrition information

Amount per serving: 2 potstickers
Calories: 226 , Total Fat: 1.9g , Saturated Fat: 0.5g , Cholesterol: 22mg , Sodium: 456mg , Carbohydrates: 38.5g , Fiber: 1.4g , Sugar: 0.5g , Protein: 12.4g

Leave a Comment

  • Reply
    Sara Welch
    July 23, 2020 at 3:04 pm

    I always order these when we eat out, but I have to say your version is waaaay better! Delicious and easier than I had expected!

  • Reply
    Toni
    July 23, 2020 at 8:21 am

    Everyone at my house loved this!! So good!

  • Reply
    Beth
    July 23, 2020 at 7:27 am

    My son absolutely love love loved these! These were a big hit at the house! Can’t wait to make these again!

  • Reply
    Erin | Dinners,Dishes and Dessert
    July 22, 2020 at 5:27 pm

    These pork potstickers are would disappear in our house!

  • Reply
    Amanda
    July 22, 2020 at 5:07 pm

    Potstickers are my favorite, I can’t wait to make these!

  • Reply
    Susan Krassensky
    July 22, 2020 at 8:25 am

    So enjoy your daily email recipes! Your ideas are so delicious . . . this one will require a bit of patience I see.

    How much water is added after the browning begins? I’m guessing not much since it’s done when the water
    is absorbed & evaporated.

    • Reply
      Deseree
      July 22, 2020 at 1:33 pm

      Hi Susan! So happy to hear you enjoy the recipes! You are correct, not much water, I usually use about 1/4 cup :)

  • Reply
    Kelly
    July 19, 2009 at 4:18 pm

    I found your blog a few months ago and love it, why have you tried out for the next food network star? I think you are better they have right now and they are looking for next years now! I think you would be great!

    • Reply
      Deseree
      July 20, 2009 at 7:51 am

      Thank you for the nice comments Kelly! I would be a little nervous to try out for that show, some of the challenges seem pretty difficult and Bobby Flay doesn’t go easy on the contestants. But who knows maybe one day :)

  • Reply
    Cookie
    July 17, 2009 at 9:45 am

    I love potstickers! I don’t eat celery but the addition of carrots and mushrooms sound great! My mom always makes wontons and freeze a bunch for later too! You don’t even have to thaw them. All you have to do is drop them in a pot of boiling water and cook for about 10 minutes.

  • Reply
    Sara @ Our Best Bites
    July 17, 2009 at 8:06 am

    LOVE potsitckers. Your recipe looks awesome, I’ll have to try it!

  • Reply
    Karine
    July 16, 2009 at 7:51 pm

    I have just found out your blog and I love it! You have many inspiring recipes!

  • Reply
    Soma
    July 16, 2009 at 6:16 pm

    Potstickers are my all time favorites. I can eat them any time of the day anywhere…somehow never make them at home.

    You yourself have a wonderful blog with very inspirational foodography.

  • Des

    Hey! I'm Des!

    Welcome to Life’s Ambrosia where Dinner is served and memories are made. Here you will find over 1000 tried and true recipes for every possible occasion. In the last 10 years, this blog has helped millions of families put dinner on the table and create food memories. Let me help you too.

    Read more »

    Have new recipes emailed to you.